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Career Tips for Yoga Teachers Warren MI

Teaching to a target audience isn't for everyone. And the maxim of "teach what you know and what inspires you" applies to gender-specific classes, too.

Michigan Dept of Labor Employment Services Agency
(989) 729-7685
1801 W Main St
Owosso, MI
 
Employee Resource Network
(517) 263-4561
Mill Rd Professional
Adrian, MI
 
Women's Center of America the
(734) 973-6779
2425 W Stadium Blvd
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Sharon A Peek Lpc Vocational Counseling
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Continuum Consulting Center
(616) 975-7855
3934 Cascade Rd SE
Grand Rapids, MI
 
Soper Ken-Lifesteward
(616) 698-3125
Caledonia, MI
 
Kreski Mary Ellen MA Lpc
(248) 417-4201
261 E Maple Rd
Southfield, MI
 
Hecker Donald L
(231) 796-3204
15635 172nd Ave
Big Rapids, MI
 
Michigan Department of Career Development
(616) 522-0481
250 E Tuttle Rd
Ionia, MI
 
Career Assessment Ctr
(616) 396-1221
70 W 8th St
Holland, MI
 

Career Tips for Yoga Teachers

Provided By:

By Sara Avant Stover

As teachers, we can be artists who sculpt experiences for our students through the words we use to teach a pose, the music we play during class, or even the ways we decorate our studios. We can also create a more meaningful experience by opting to teach to target audiences.

This is not a new concept. A glance at any studio's schedule offers us plenty of options: Basics, Level 2/3, Hot Yoga, Prenatal Yoga, Mysore, Meditation. Rarely, however, do we see options such as Women's Yoga or Men's Yoga listed.

Yes, yoga offers freedom to everyone, regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, or religion; but are there times when it would be more effective to teach to men or women only? And if so, is such an undertaking financially viable?

Let Personal Experience Guide You

Teaching to a target audience isn't for everyone. And the maxim of "teach what you know and what inspires you" applies to gender-specific classes, too.

For Janice Gates, author of Yogini: The Power of Women in Yoga and owner of the Yoga Garden in San Anselmo, California, the inspiration to teach women's-only yoga retreats arose out of her personal practice.

"In the early '90s, when I was practicing and teaching Ashtanga Yoga," she explains, "I kept bumping up against the reality that the practice was designed by and for men and had a very masculine flavor to it. Meanwhile, most of my students at that time were women."

Click here to read full article from Yoga Journal