Brick Veneer Bowing Ann Arbor MI

This is fairly common in masonry veneer high-rise buildings in Ann Arbor where relieving angles are used without horizontal expansion joints. During construction, a small gap generally is left between the bottom of each relieving angle and the top of the brick below.

Hane Tile & Plastering Mason
(734) 971-8298
2771 Lookout Cir
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Brother'S Construction
(734) 665-8109
1235 Astor Ave
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Quadratic Masonry Llc
(734) 663-9646
3877 Albert Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Grammatico Masonry
(734) 769-4101
435 Evergreen Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Hoffman Plastering
(734) 663-5262
872 Rose Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Leidal And Heart Mason Contractors
(734) 622-8485
101 E Keech
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Daven Port Masonry
(734) 926-0034
105 S State St
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Paul Henes Masonry
(734) 769-0880
3687 Jackson Rd
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Omega Construction & General Repair
(734) 665-8154
4042 Ann Arbor Saline Rd
Ann Arbor, MI
 
Rose Tile & Masonry
(734) 662-8004
1917 Dunmore Rd
Ann Arbor, MI
 

Brick Veneer Bowing

Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 1993

On a 20-story brick-veneer building, the masonry is bulging and cracking at each relieving angle. The building has no horizontal expansion joints. Could the cracking result from brick expansion? What can be done?

This is fairly common in masonry veneer high-rise buildings where relieving angles are used without horizontal expansion joints. During construction, a small gap generally is left between the bottom of each relieving angle and the top of the brick below. As the masonry grows due to moisture and thermal expansion, the gap between the masonry and the shelf angle narrows. Mortar placed at the tip of the angle creates a solid bridge between the masonry above and below the relieving angle. This portion of the joint cannot compress. Resulting forces often cause bowing and spalling. Also look at tie placement. If the nearest ties are more than 12 inches above and below the relieving angle, bowing is more likely. Corrosion of the shelf angle also can cause bowing. Steelcorrosion products are larger than steel itself. This creates pressures that act on the wall similarly to moisture and thermal expansion. These problems are compounded if the building's frame shrinks over time as the masonry expands. Bowing and spalling can be prevented by leaving adequate space beneath each angle during construction. The size of these spaces depends on expected movement. Procedures for sizing joints are given in BIA Tec...

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